(Video) How to Train the Most Deadly Pull Up Jumper in Basketball

Golfers especially talk about “grooving” their swing, and in almost every sport a player strives for that feeling of “getting in the groove,” the feeling that everything is going just right. In basketball there is one quick, specific way to practice shooting that is very effective for putting your shot-off-the-dribble in the groove.

Read Article

How to Plan for Success on the Basketball Court

Scientific experimentation has shown conclusively the value of setting goals. If you have to prepare and mail a thousand letters, and if someone else who works exactly like you has to do the same, you can get your letters done faster by having your thousand in stacks of ten and the other guy’s letters in one stack of a thousand. If he has the stacks of ten and you the one stack of a thousand, he will do his faster.

Read Article

How to Approach a Sports Injury

No injury is truly crippling unless you let it cripple your mind. When you get an injury, try to see the big picture. Forget the woe-is-me attitude, and don’t worry that your plans are suddenly ruined. Get complete information from medical experts so you know exactly what you are dealing with, and then do what they say. Often, it seems the only thing you can do is be patient and wait.

Read Article

Mistakes Require Action

In response to an error, Hustle-CAT is a good term to remember and a good thing to do. In all the continuous team sports like basketball, soccer, volleyball, and hockey—and sometimes in baseball and football as well—a player will make a mistake and have the opportunity immediately either to compound the mistake or to correct it. If your error immobilizes you while you pause to demonstrate your anguish or anger, you compound your error.

Read Article

THINK THE GAME

Join us this summer and discover how to become a playmaker, lead your team, and run the show.
Find Your Camp

Great Basketball Players Don’t Make Great Plays

Common sense might seem to tell you that great plays are what make the difference between a good player and a mediocre player. But most coaches would disagree. More often, they would say, great plays—or the attempts to make great plays—are what make good players mediocre.

Read Article

How to Get the Ball More on Offense

Players shouldn’t be shy about asking for the ball. The “He’s a ball hog” theory is correct a lot less often than the “He just didn’t see you that time” theory; all too often the problem is that you didn’t look very open. No one should expect to get the ball even half of the times he is open. You should expect something more like one out of ten. Therefore, you should put a definite plan into effect that can help you get the ball more often.

Read Article

Jumping is Not a Valuable Skill on Defense

Fleet means quick-moving, and here it is also a made-up word for “FLoored feEET.” Feet on the floor, on defense. Never leave your feet on defense, not even to block a pass, not even to block a shot. For every pass you block by jumping, two will get by you, and you will be slow getting to a good defensive help-position because you are not FLEET when you are in the air. You have to wait until you come down to move.

Read Article

Do You Take Advantage of Dead Ball Time?

Mediocre players use this time to rest, to complain, to limp, to frown at referees, to look around at the crowd. The problem is that many talented players use the time when the clock is stopped for the same purposes. But there is an endless number of valuable things a good player can do while the clock is stopped if he is thinking and really trying to be as much of an asset to his team as he possibly can.

Read Article